Product: 221188
The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway
The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway
The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway
The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway
The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway
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The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway

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An Amazon Best Book of the Month, February 2014: While reading Doug Most’s The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and
the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway, it quickly becomes apparent that the 19th-century world was a
dirty, slow-moving place. Not only were the modern cities of the world filled with horses, they were filled with their
excrement, along with all the billowing smoke and caked dirt that modern industry of the time could produce. The Race
Underground offers a colorful and informative description of that bygone era. Famous names surface throughout the
book--men like Andrew Carnegie, Boss Tweed, and Thomas Edison. But Most ties the story together through two less famous,
more essential brothers: Henry Whitney of Boston and William Whitney of New York. When the city of London built the
first subway, it might have seemed only a matter of time before one was constructed in a major U.S. city. The truth is
much more complicated and fascinating than that. Most shows how getting through government intransigence and payola was
as daunting as getting a hole carved through the earth. It was a time when great minds turned themselves toward
bettering the world they lived in, but in some ways the past seems all too familiar. --Chris Schluep

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