A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail

by Bryson, Bill


Order now to get it by: Saturday February 04 - Monday February 06

Expedited Shipping available

Get it on Sunday January 29th with expedited shipping.

Select the expedited delivery option after adding this item to your cart.

Condition: New

Product ID: 256067

Delivery Information |Returns & Exchanges |Payment Methods

Description

Your initial reaction to Bill Bryson's reading of A Walk in the Woods may well be "Egads! What a bore!" But by sentence
three or four, his clearly articulated, slightly adenoidal, British/American-accented speech pattern begins to grow on
you and becomes quite engaging. You immediately get a hint of the humor that lies ahead, such as one of the innumerable
reasons he longed to walk as many of the 2,100 miles of the Appalachian Trail as he could. "It would get me fit after
years of waddlesome sloth" is delivered with glorious deadpan flair. By the time our storyteller recounts his trip to
the Dartmouth Co-op, suffering serious sticker shock over equipment prices, you'll be hooked.

When Bryson speaks for the many Americans he encounters along the way--in various shops, restaurants, airports, and
along the trail--he launches into his American accent, which is whiny and full of hard r's. And his southern intonations
are a hoot. He's even got a special voice used exclusively when speaking for his somewhat surprising trail partner,
Katz. In the 25 years since their school days together, Katz has put on quite a bit of weight. In fact, "he brought to
mind Orson Welles after a very bad night. He was limping a little and breathing harder than one ought to after a walk of
20 yards." Katz often speaks in monosyllables, and Bryson brings his limited vocabulary humorously to life. One of
Katz's more memorable utterings is "flung," as in flung most of his provisions over the cliff because they were too
heavy to carry any farther.

The author has thoroughly researched the history and the making of the Appalachian Trail. Bryson describes the
destruction of many parts of the forest and warns of the continuing perils (both natural and man-made) the Trail faces.
He speaks of the natural beauty and splendor as he and Katz pass through, and he recalls clearly the serious dangers the
two face during their time together on the trail. So, A Walk in the Woods is not simply an out-of-shape, middle-aged
man's desire to prove that he can still accomplish a major physical task; it's also a plea for the conservation of
America's last wilderness. Bryson's telling is a knee-slapping, laugh-out-loud funny trek through the woods, with a
touch of science and history thrown in for good measure. (Running time: 360 minutes, four cassettes) --Colleen Preston

more...