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The Goldfinch: (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
The Goldfinch: (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
The Goldfinch: (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
The Goldfinch: (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)
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The Goldfinch: (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction)

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Product Description

Used Book in Good Condition

Imported from USA

An Amazon Best Book of the Month, October 2013: It's hard to articulate just how much--and why--The Goldfinch held such
power for me as a reader. Always a sucker for a good boy-and-his-mom story, I probably was taken in at first by the
cruelly beautiful passages in which 13-year-old Theo Decker tells of the accident that killed his beloved mother and set
his fate. But even when the scene shifts--first Theo goes to live with his schoolmate’s picture-perfect (except it
isn’t) family on Park Avenue, then to Las Vegas with his father and his trashy wife, then back to a New York antiques
shop--I remained mesmerized. Along with Boris, Theo’s Ukrainian high school sidekick, and Hobie, one of the most
wonderfully eccentric characters in modern literature, Theo--strange, grieving, effete, alcoholic and often not close to
honorable Theo--had taken root in my heart. Still, The Goldfinch is more than a 700-plus page turner about a tragic
loss: it’s also a globe-spanning mystery about a painting that has gone missing, an examination of friendship, and a
rumination on the nature of art and appearances. Most of all, it is a sometimes operatic, often unnerving and always
moving chronicle of a certain kind of life. “Things would have turned out better if she had lived,” Theo said of his
mother, fourteen years after she died. An understatement if ever there was one, but one that makes the selfish reader
cry out: Oh, but then we wouldn’t have had this brilliant book! --Sara Nelson

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