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StrengthsFinder 2.0

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From the Publisher
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STRENGTHS: THE NEXT GENERATION

Q&A with author Tom Rath

(From the Gallup Management Journal; interviewed by Jennifer Robison)

Last month, StrengthsFinder 2.0 hit the bookstores. Book browsers, no doubt, had many questions, and among them was
probably "Didn't I already read a book about this?"

Well, actually, yes. But the topic was worth revisiting for two reasons. In the six years since the release of Now,
Discover Your Strengths, more than 2 million people have taken the Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment, which means
billions of people have not yet had the opportunity. The second reason is that Gallup researchers just haven't been able
to let the topic rest. Over the past decade, they've done more surveys, more interviews, and more studies; they've
prodded and poked and analyzed. And they realized that there's a lot more to understanding human talent than most people
know. Those who are familiar with the StrengthsFinder assessment know that it is designed to uncover certain key talents
-- patterns of thought, feeling, and behavior that can be productively applied. These patterns are categorized into 34
broad themes -- such as Achiever, Ideation, and Relator -- and those themes indicate and predict one's innate and unique
talents. Those talents, when multiplied by the investment of time spent practicing, developing skills, and building
knowledge, can become strengths. Some of this is just common sense; it seems intuitive that your performance will be
better if you're doing what you naturally do well. But some of it seems counterintuitive and runs directly against
conventional wisdom: No amount of training will help you excel in your areas of weakness. You can't do anything you want
to do -- or be anything you want to be -- because you're just not going to be good at everything. But if you work with
your talents, you can be extraordinary. StrengthsFinder has resonated with the business community because there's a
direct link between talent development and performance. In this interview, Tom Rath, author of StrengthsFinder 2.0,
discusses what Gallup scientists have learned since the publication of the first book, what more there is to discover
about your talents, and why it's bad to focus on your employees' weaknesses, but simply cruel to ignore them completely.
GMJ: Why the new book?

Tom Rath: StrengthsFinder 2.0 is an effort to get the core message and language out to a much broader audience. We had
no idea how well received the first strengths book would be by general readers -- it was oriented more toward managers
-- or that the energy and excitement would continue to grow. More than two million people have taken the StrengthsFinder
assessment, and each month, the number of people learning about their talents goes up. But readers keep asking us: "Now
that I know about my strengths, what do I do next?" So we went back and surveyed hundreds of them and asked them how
they apply their talents. Then we whittled their suggestions down to the ten best ideas for each theme. We also added
more than five thousand Strengths Insights to version 2.0 that allow us to offer more individualized theme descriptions
than we could before. So, instead of general descriptions of your top five talent themes, in 2.0, you get a talent
profile so unique that you're unlikely to share even a sentence with someone else. And as I said, the first book was
really written for a business audience. People have had trouble retrofitting the theme descriptions if they are in
non-management roles, but they've tried. This book helps readers apply strengths theory to any type of role and gives
them ideas to help them apply their talents in their daily life. GMJ: It's been six years since the first book was
published, and Gallup has done hundreds of thousands more interviews. Have you discovered anything new about talents and
strengths? Have you altered your original premise?

Rath: No, but we've seen more and more evidence that demonstrates that focusing on your talents is important. We did a
survey in 2004 that examined what happens when your manager ignores you, focuses on your strengths, or focuses on your
weaknesses. We found that if your manager focuses on your strengths, your chances of being actively disengaged go down
to one in one hundred. However, if your manager primarily focuses on your weaknesses, your chances of being actively
disengaged are 22%, and if your manager ignores you, that percentage rises to 40%. GMJ: Why such a high rate of
disengagement among those who are ignored?

Rath: It basically mirrors the psychology of raising kids -- being completely ignored is the worst possible
psychological state. You would actually feel better if your manager went from ignoring you to focusing on what you do
wrong all the time, because then at least she's paying attention to you. GMJ: Did your new research turn up anything
that surprised you?

Rath: We've talked a lot about how strengths can help you be more of who you are, and you get more out of your best
players, and all of that. But in the last ten years, we've also found that it's a good strategy just to wipe out the
extreme negativity in the workplace. I get this question almost every time I talk to a group: "What do I do about that
one person who just drags everyone down every day?" My glib answer was to get rid of the person. I always thought there
were some people who were just destined to be disengaged in their jobs because that was their personality, and no matter
how hard managers tried, there wasn't much they could do with some of those people. But the data from the last five
years would suggest that much of that epidemic of disengagement is fixable. More than I ever would have guessed, it
helps tremendously if a manager starts by focusing on someone's strengths. You may not take someone who's actively
disengaged and make him into your most engaged employee, but it will help get him out of that mindset where he's scaring
off colleagues and customers. GMJ: So is that the business case to be made for putting people in roles that play to
their strengths? Rath: I think it's the secondary business case. The main business case is that people have a lot more
fun and get a lot more done if they're able to spend time in areas where they have some natural talent. I think that's a
fundamental principle that hasn't changed much at all. The one thing that we were clear about in StrengthsFinder 2.0 is
that the American dream ideal that "You can be anything you want if you just try hard enough" is detrimental. This is
especially true when people buy into it hook, line, and sinker. You may not be able to be anything you want to be, but
you can be a lot more of who you already are. [Taking] StrengthsFinder is just a starting point; it's step one of a
hundred in figuring out the areas where you have the most potential for growth. GMJ: What is the most challenging aspect
of your ongoing strengths research?

Rath: While hundreds of people in our organization continue to research this topic each year, our greatest challenge
might be incorporating the new research while making the message even more succinct and applicable to a wider audience.
So while we have hundreds of new case studies and meta-analyses about strengths -- and about employee engagement and
business outcomes -- we tried to stay as close as we could to the basics. GMJ: The Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment
has always categorized talents into thirty-four themes. Have you ever considered adding or subtracting any, or refining
them further?

Rath: Yes, we looked at that extensively as we started to review our plan for the updated version of the assessment. We
found that so far, the thirty-four themes have done a good job of describing much of what we've learned since releasing
the first version of the assessment. If enough people had made a case about a specific theme that didn't exist, we were
open to adding that theme. I think we probably will continue to investigate whether there are themes that emerge that we
haven't yet picked up on. But there wasn't a real strong case for any additions at this time. GMJ: What would you most
like to accomplish with StrengthsFinder 2.0?

Rath: Our big goal and mission as a company is to help people do more of what they do well. We've topped two million
completed StrengthsFinder assessments, and it's not too hard to imagine that number getting to twenty million soon. An
organization that exists to help people has a responsibility to get better and better. By reaching beyond our initial
audience, we help people get the latest and greatest research. But we also hope it helps people live better lives.

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From the Inside Flap
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ABOUT STRENGTHSFINDER

In 1998, the Father of Strengths Psychology, Donald O. Clifton, Ph.D. (1924-2003), along with Tom Rath and a team of
scientists at The Gallup Organization, created the online StrengthsFinder assessment. In 2001, they included the first
edition of StrengthsFinder with the bestseller Now, Discover Your Strengths. In 2004, the assessment's name was formally
changed to "Clifton StrengthsFinder" in honor of its chief designer.

In 2007, building on the initial assessment and language from StrengthsFinder 1.0, Rath and Gallup scientists released a
new edition of the assessment, program, and website, dubbed "StrengthsFinder 2.0." Rooted in more than 40 years of
research, this assessment has helped millions discover and develop their natural talents.

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