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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

by Crown


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Product ID: 352196

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  • Used Book in Good Condition
  • Amazon Best Books of the Month, February 2010: From a single, abbreviated life grew a seemingly immortal line of cells
    that made some of the most crucial innovations in modern science possible. And from that same life, and those cells,
    Rebecca Skloot has fashioned in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks a fascinating and moving story of medicine and
    family, of how life is sustained in laboratories and in memory. Henrietta Lacks was a mother of five in Baltimore, a
    poor African American migrant from the tobacco farms of Virginia, who died from a cruelly aggressive cancer at the age
    of 30 in 1951. A sample of her cancerous tissue, taken without her knowledge or consent, as was the custom then, turned
    out to provide one of the holy grails of mid-century biology: human cells that could survive--even thrive--in the lab.
    Known as HeLa cells, their stunning potency gave scientists a building block for countless breakthroughs, beginning with
    the cure for polio. Meanwhile, Henrietta's family continued to live in poverty and frequently poor health, and their
    discovery decades later of her unknowing contribution--and her cells' strange survival--left them full of pride, anger,
    and suspicion. For a decade, Skloot doggedly but compassionately gathered the threads of these stories, slowly gaining
    the trust of the family while helping them learn the truth about Henrietta, and with their aid she tells a rich and
    haunting story that asks the questions, Who owns our bodies? And who carries our memories? --Tom Nissley

    Amazon Exclusive: Jad Abumrad Reviews The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    Jad Abumrad is host and creator of the public radio hit Radiolab, now in its seventh season and reaching over a million
    people monthly. Radiolab combines cutting-edge production with a philosophical approach to big ideas in science and
    beyond, and an inventive method of storytelling. Abumrad has won numerous awards, including a National Headliner Award
    in Radio and an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science Journalism Award. Read his exclusive
    Amazon guest review of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks:

    Honestly, I can't imagine a better tale.

    A detective story that's at once mythically large and painfully intimate.

    Just the simple facts are hard to believe: that in 1951, a poor black woman named Henrietta Lacks dies of cervical
    cancer, but pieces of the tumor that killed her--taken without her knowledge or consent--live on, first in one lab, then
    in hundreds, then thousands, then in giant factories churning out polio vaccines, then aboard rocket ships launched
    into space. The cells from this one tumor would spawn a multi-billion dollar industry and become a foundation of modern
    science--leading to breakthroughs in gene mapping, cloning and fertility and helping to discover how viruses work and
    how cancer develops (among a million other things). All of which is to say: the science end of this story is enough to
    blow one's mind right out of one's face.

    But what's truly remarkable about Rebecca Skloot's book is that we also get the rest of the story, the part that could
    have easily remained hidden had she not spent ten years unearthing it: Who was Henrietta Lacks? How did she live? How
    she did die? Did her family know that she'd become, in some sense, immortal, and how did that affect them? These are
    crucial questions, because science should never forget the people who gave it life. And so, what unfolds is not only a
    reporting tour de force but also a very entertaining account of Henrietta, her ancestors, her cells and the scientists
    who grew them.

    The book ultimately channels its journey of discovery though Henrietta's youngest daughter, Deborah, who never knew her
    mother, and who dreamt of one day being a scientist.

    As Deborah Lacks and Skloot search for answers, we're bounced effortlessly from the tiny tobacco-farming Virginia
    hamlet of Henrietta's childhood to modern-day Baltimore, where Henrietta's family remains. Along the way, a series of
    unforgettable juxtapositions: cell culturing bumps into faith healings, cutting edge medicine collides with the dark
    truth that Henrietta's family can't afford the health insurance to care for diseases their mother's cells have helped to
    cure.

    Rebecca Skloot tells the story with great sensitivity, urgency and, in the end, damn fine writing. I highly recommend
    this book. --Jad Abumrad

    Look Inside The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    Click on thumbnails for larger images

    Henrietta and David Lacks, circa 1945.

    Elsie Lacks, Henrietta’s older daughter, about five years before she was committed to Crownsville State Hospital, with a
    diagnosis of “idiocy.”

    Deborah Lacks at about age four.

    The home-house where Henrietta was raised, a four-room log cabin in Clover, Virginia, that once served as slave
    quarters. (1999)

    Main Street in downtown Clover, Virginia, where Henrietta was raised, circa 1930s.

    Margaret Gey and Minnie, a lab technician, in the Gey lab at Hopkins, circa 1951.

    Deborah with her children, LaTonya and Alfred, and her second husband, James Pullum, in the mid-1980s.

    In 2001, Deborah developed a severe case of hives after learning upsetting new information about her mother and sister.

    Deborah and her cousin Gary Lacks standing in front of drying tobacco, 2001.

    The Lacks family in 2009.

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